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Time Once Lost Cannot Be Regained Essay Format

Why I Had to Unlearn Everything From the 7th Grade to Finish Writing My Thesis 

My first assignment in 7th grade was to write a report about my favorite book that I read during the summer.

Our teacher, Ms. P, was a no-nonsense person, and she handed out a detailed template for the report.

In capital roman numerals she listed the major sections which included information about the book, characters, main plot, and my opinion of the book.

Within each section there were subsections with details about each character, place of story, and how the problem was solved.

Up to that point this was the longest piece of writing I had to produce.

I am not a native English speaker (I was born in Hungary), and I had only been in the Unites States for only one year at that time.

Yet, I was determined to get an A+.

My parents had to make sacrifices for us to be able to move to the US and I wanted to make them proud of me.

I listened to Ms. P’s words very carefully and followed the outline verbatim.

As she suggested, I went through the different sections in the order they were listed.

The result was a boring and straight-forward paper.

I did not get an A+, just an A, but this was enough to convince me that Ms. P’s outline was the recipe for writing good papers.

I applied this process all throughout middle school, high school, and college.

While  I did not enjoy writing at the time, Ms. P’s orderly method served me well enough to get A’s on most of my essays and term papers.

Fast forward to my second year in graduate school: the time when I had to write my thesis proposal.

I had 2 months to write my proposal and I struggled for weeks.

For some reason, every time I sat down to write, my brain froze.

Ms. P’s method was not working.

Previously, in English and History classes in college, I had been given a clearly-defined assignments.

There was a title, and a list of questions that I had to answer within my report.

The writing of my thesis proposal presented a completely different set of challenges.

I only had a very vaguely defined topic and nearly a hundred journal articles to go through.

This was the first time that I had to come up with both the topic of the paper and the paper itself.

In addition, I had defend it in front of my committee and convince them that this was an original contribution to my field of research.

This was daunting given that I had only 1 year of experience in the lab (and that was part-time, as I was taking classes as well).

How could I possibly come up with a research topic, let alone put together an outline, and write each section in an orderly fashion?

After weeks of struggling and staring blankly at my computer screen, I was very close to deciding to give up and leave graduate school altogether.

One evening, my friends invited me to dinner to celebrate our colleague’s birthday.

During the dinner I began talking with one of the postdocs about the struggles I was having with my thesis proposal.

She just shook her head and said:

Are you trying to write your proposal from beginning to end?

We always leave writing of the abstract and the introduction to the end.

Just start with your methods section and your preliminary data.

That’s what the committee will pay the most attention to anyway.”

I began writing that very night, and my process went against everything Ms. P taught me.

Instead of writing everything from beginning to end, I just summarized all the data that I collected and my methods.

I felt so liberated, that I disregarded grammar and style.

I just wrote as much as I could in 2 hours so I could get home by a reasonable time.

With this push in momentum, I was able to finish my thesis proposal by the deadline (with all the grammar and style corrected in the final draft) and defend it in front of my committee.

Tossing out Ms. P’s orderly process was the first step in learning academic writing (or any creative writing for that matter).

During the next few years I learned even more strategies that were essential to help me to complete my thesis by the deadline.

Are you still writing the way you were taught in the 7th grade?

Those habits might be holding you back from producing high quality manuscripts and finishing your thesis.

7 Rules You Must Violate to Write a High Quality Thesis

1. Writing the sections of your thesis in order

Since research is a journey of discovery it is impossible to write your thesis from beginning to end.

Most researchers write the abstract last.

It varies from student to student which section is easiest.

In the experimental science the methods sections is usually easiest to begin with, followed by the results sections.

I have coached students in the humanities and social sciences as well, and they usually don’t write all the chapters in order either.

Sometimes the introduction (literature search) is the toughest, and many students leave it until the end.

Start with whichever chapter is easiest for you so you can pick up momentum in your writing.

2 Write for a set number hours a day

While it is great if you have blocked out time in your calendar every day for writing, it is more important to focus on the results than the time you spend writing.

Without well-defined goals, two hours of writing can produce absolutely nothing.

Instead, try to write a certain number of pages, or complete a clear and realistic goal such as creating a table or making a figure.

3. If you skip a day, make it up the next day by writing twice as much

We are all great planners – or at least we try to be.

We make a plan, and a week later we discover that we did not really follow through.

So, the following week we try even harder to “make up” for all the lost time.

This is a mistake, and it can lead to burnout and poor quality writing.

To produce high quality writing, focus on today’s writing only.

Forget the guilt of not writing enough yesterday.

Put aside any worries about how you will meet your writing goals tomorrow.

Make the best of every day by setting realistic goals for that day – this will help you to keep up your momentum.

4. Make yourself resist distractions

If I could have a dollar for every graduate graduate student who asked me: “How can I resist distractions”? I would have a small fortune.

Try to “not think of a white elephant” .

Do you see the white elephant?

I do too.

Your mind is quite stubborn.

Once it comes up with an idea, such as “I must email XYZ to ask about….” it will not leave you alone until you do something about it.

But that something does not have to be writing the email and getting distracted by all the messages in your inbox.

The simplest solutions is to write every thought down.

If it is out of your head and on a piece of paper there is a good chance your mind will leave you alone.

(Notebooks and notepads work better than post-its).

Then, take care of these items once you finish writing.

There are many ways to “resist” social media (disconnect from the Internet while writing).

But, if social media is important for your work (e.g. Linkedin for job searching), you need to  set reasonable boundaries.

A good solution is to go on social media only at predefined times of day – and preferably late in the day after you got your work done.

5. Follow rules of grammar and style while you write

Remember the spelling tests from second and third grade?

Many schools today place a smaller emphasis on spelling, and focus more helping students to develop their creative writing skills.

The reason is that teachers realized that students were afraid to express their ideas if they did not know how to spell certain words.

Many students try to get the grammar, style, and even formatting of their thesis perfect even before they have all their ideas down.

Remember that it is much easier to correct your grammar and spelling than to write creatively.

Use your writing time for putting as many ideas on paper as you can.

Leave the editing and styling for the later stages after you have all your arguments in order.

6. Write when you feel inspired

This rule is tricky.

Yes, if you feel inspired it is a good idea to write down any ideas you have.

If you can carry around a small notebook to capture your impromptu thoughts, it could save you from staring at the computer screen blankly for hours.

The problem with this rule is that it leads students to believe that inspiration will come someday, and then they can start to write.

To finish writing your thesis you also have to write when you are not inspired.

In fact, 95% of the time when you write you will not feel any inspiration at all when you sit down at the computer.

Skilled writers know how to write when they have no inspiration at all, and they would rather be doing anything else (including cleaning the bathroom), than to write.

There is no secret.

When you have a deadline to meet, and you have no ideas, you need to write anyway.

If you feel stuck, do some free writing.

You can even write about why you cannot write about your thesis.

After 10 pages of free writing, there is a very good chance that you will have some ideas that can go into your thesis or paper.

The good news is that if you write when you do not have any inspiration, the inspiration will come as you write.

This is a very rewarding process.

7. Grandma’s law: You have to eat your zucchini (or spinach, lima beans, broccoli etc.) before you can have dessert

This law works to some extent when applied during dinner time, but it can lead to having an aversion to foods that are actually good for you.

In graduate school this law can lead to self-deprivation for years, which can result in loss of motivation and focus. 

Many graduate students have no publishable results until their final year.

Does this mean that you should not reward yourself until your thesis is approved and bound in a shiny black cover?

Rewarding yourself for your effort consistently (whether you get good results or not), will actually lead to increased self-confidence and better quality work. 

Celebrate each small success – and definitely do not wait until your graduation party to have dessert!

When I was a 1st year student a postdoc told me that he felt empty inside after he defended his thesis successfully.

He was not proud of himself at all.

While he was relieved, he did not feel like celebrating.

I had a similar experience.

My hooding ceremony was a day just like any other.

I did not feel ecstatic, and it actually surprised me how ordinary the day was after so many years of anticipation. 

Don’t wait for others or external results to give you a sense of accomplishment.

You need to give yourself the feeling of confidence, whether your work goes well or not.

Celebrate each small victory and every small step you take in the right direction.

Whether  you celebrate with dessert, a movie, or a night out with friends, your creative mind will thank you for taking care of it on a regular basis.

What is your #1 challenge when it comes to writing your thesis? Please leave a comment below and I will reply to you directly 🙂

Click here to get on the waiting list for the online “Finish Your Thesis Program” and get a copy of my free book “Finish Your Thesis Faster”

Time is a concept referring to the perceived flow of actions and events from the past to future, or to its measurement. In physics it is also referred to as "the fourth dimension" of a space-time continuum.

CONTENTS
Alphabetized
by author or source
A · B · C · D · E · F · G · H · I · J · K · L · M · N · O · P · Q · R · S · T · U · V · W · X · Y · Z
The Dictionary of Legal Quotations (1904)
Hoyt's New Cyclopedia Of Practical Quotations (1922)
Respectfully Quoted: A Dictionary of Quotations (1989)
See also · External links

A[edit]

  • The sword of time will pierce our skin
    It doesn't hurt when it begins
    But as it works its way on in
    The pain grows stronger watch I bring
    That suicide is painless
    It brings so many changes
    And I can take or leave them if I please.
  • Remember that time slurs over everything, let all deeds fade, blurs all writings and kills all memories. Exempt are only those which dig into the hearts of men by love.
    • Aristotle, Free Translation from the French version of a letter named "The Letter of Aristotle to Alexander on the Policy toward the Cities". Basis for translation: Lettre d’Aristote à Alexandre sur la politique envers les cités, Arabic text edition and translated/edited by Józef Bielawski and Marian Plezia (Warsaw: Polish Academy of Sciences, 1970), page 72
  • That time either has no being at all, or is only scarcely and faintly, one might suspect from this: part of it has happened and is not, while the other part is going to be but is not yet, and it is out of these that the infinite, or any given, time is composed. But it would seem impossible for a thing composed of non-beings to have any share in being.
  • Aristotle, Physics, as translated by Joe Sachs (Rutgers University Press: 2011), 217b30
  • Time is not composed of indivisible nows any more than any other magnitude is composed of indivisibles.
  • Whether if soul did not exist time would exist or not, is a question that may fairly be asked; for if there cannot be someone to count there cannot be anything that can be counted, so that evidently there cannot be number; for number is either what has been, or what can be, counted.
  • O let not Time deceive you,
    You cannot conquer Time.
  • But if any excursive brain rove over the images of forepassed times, and wonder that Thou the God Almighty and All-creating and All-supporting, Maker of heaven and earth, didst for innumerable ages forbear from so great a work, before Thou Wouldest make it; let him awake and consider, that he wonders at false conceits. For whence could innumerable ages pass by, which Thou madest not, Thou the Author and Creator of all ages? or what times should there be, which were not made by Thee? or how should they pass by, if they never were? Seeing then Thou art the Creator of all times, if any time was before Thou madest heaven and earth, why say they that Thou didst forego working? For that very time didst Thou make, nor could times pass by, before Thou madest those times. But if before heaven and earth there was no time, why is it demanded, what Thou then didst? For there was no "then," when there was no time.

B[edit]

  • With regard to authority, it is the greatest weakness to attribute infinite credit to particular authors, and to refuse his own prerogative to time, the author of all authors, and, therefore, of all authority. For truth is rightly named the daughter of time not of authority. It is not wonderful, therefore, if the bonds of antiquity, authority, and unanimity have so enchained the power of man, that he is unable (as if bewitched) to become familiar with things themselves.
  • And he that will not apply New Remedies, must expect New Evils: for Time is the greatest Innovateur...
  • We must not confuse the present with the past. With regard to the past, no further action is possible. There have been war, plague, scandal, and treason, and there is no way of our preventing their having taken place; the executioner became an executioner and the victim underwent his fate as a victim without us; all that we can do is to reveal it, to integrate it into the human heritage, to raise it to the dignity of the aesthetic existence which bears within itself its finality; but first this history had to occur: it occurred as scandal, revolt, crime, or sacrifice, and we were able to try to save it only because it first offered us a form. Today must also exist before being confirmed in its existence: its destination in such a way that everything about it already seemed justified and that there was no more of it to reject, then there would also be nothing to say about it, for no form would take shape in it; it is revealed only through rejection, desire, hate and love.
  • In what time does man live? The thinkers have always known that he does not live in any time at all. The immortality of thoughts and deeds banishes him to a timeless realm at whose heart an inscrutable death lies in wait. ... Devoured by the countless demands of the moment, time slipped away from him; the medium in which the pure melody of his youth would swell was destroyed. The fulfilled tranquility in which his late maturity would ripen was stolen from him. It was purloined by everyday reality, which, with its events, chance occurrences, and obligations, disrupted the myriad opportunities of youthful time, immortal time. ... From day to day, second to second, the self preserves itself, clinging to that instrument: time, the instrument that it was supposed to play.
    • Walter Benjamin, "The Metaphysics of Youth," in Walter Benjamin: Selected Writings, Vol. 1 (1996), pp. 10-11
  • I see the Four-fold Man.
    The Humanity in deadly sleep,
    And its fallen Emanation. The Spectre & its cruel Shadow.
    I see the Past, Present & Future, existing all at once
    Before me; O Divine Spirit sustain me on thy wings!
    • William Blake, Jerusalem The Emanation of the Giant Albion (c. 1803–1820) Ch. 1, plate 15, lines 6-9
  • Eternity is in love with the productions of time.
    • William Blake, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, "Proverbs of Hell"
  • Time is the most precious gift in our possession, for it is the most irrevocable. This is what makes it so disturbing to look back upon the time which we have lost. Time lost is time when we have not lived a full human life, time unenriched by experience, creative endeavor, enjoyment, and suffering. Time lost is time not filled, time left empty.
    • Dietrich Bonhoeffer, as quoted in LIFE magazine (22 April 1957), p. 152; also in Letters and Papers from Prison (1967), p. 47
  • Time can't be measured in days the way money is measured in pesos and centavos, because all pesos are equal, while every day, perhaps every hour, is different.
    • Jorge Luis Borges, "Juan Muraña", in Brodie's Report (1970); tr. Andrew Hurley, Collected Fictions (1998)
  • Being with you and not being with you is the only way I have to measure time.
  • The Garden of Forking Paths is an incomplete, but not false, image of the universe as Ts'ui Pên conceived it. In contrast to Newton and Schopenhauer, your ancestor did not believe in a uniform, absolute time. He believed in an infinite series of times, in a growing, dizzying net of divergent, convergent and parallel times. This network of times which approached one another, forked, broke off, or were unaware of one another for centuries, embraces all possibilities of time. We do not exist in the majority of these times; in some you exist, and not I; in others I, and not you; in others, both of us.
    • Variant translation: This web of time — the strands of which approach one another, bifurcate, intersect or ignore each other through the centuries — embrace every possibility.
    • Jorge Luis Borges, The Garden of Forking Paths (1958) as translated by Donald A. Yates
  • Time forks perpetually toward innumerable futures.
    • Jorge Luis Borges, The Garden of Forking Paths (1958) as translated by Donald A. Yates
  • And yet, and yet … Negar la sucesión temporal, negar el yo, negar el universo astronómico, son desesperaciones aparentes y consuelos secretos. Nuestro destino no es espantoso por irreal: es espantoso porque es irreversible y de hierro. El tiempo es la sustancia de que estoy hecho. El tiempo es un río que me arrebata, pero yo soy el río; es un tigre que me destroza, pero yo soy el tigre; es un fuego que me consume, pero yo soy el fuego. El mundo desgraciadamente es real; yo, desgraciadamente, soy Borges.
    • And yet, and yet . . . Denying temporal succession, denying the self, denying the astronomical universe, are apparent desperations and secret consolations. Our destiny is not frightful by being unreal; it is frightful because it is irreversible and iron-clad. Time is the substance I am made of. Time is a river which sweeps me along, but I am the river; it is a tiger which destroys me, but I am the tiger; it is a fire which consumes me, but I am the fire. The world, unfortunately, is real; I, unfortunately, am Borges.
    • "A New Refutation of Time" (1946) ["Nueva refutación del tiempo"]
    • Variant translations:
      • And yet, and yet... Denying temporal succession, denying the self, denying the astronomical universe, are obvious acts of desperation and secret consolation. Our fate (unlike the hell of Swedenborg or the hell of Tibetan mythology) is not frightful because it is unreal; it is frightful because it is irreversible and ironclad. Time is the thing I am made of. Time is a river that sweeps me along, but I am the river; it is a tiger that tears me apart, but I am the tiger; it is a fire that consumes me, but I am the fire. The world, unfortunately, is real; I, unfortunately, am Borges.
      • Time is the substance from which I am made. Time is a river which carries me along, but I am the river; it is a tiger that devours me, but I am the tiger; it is a fire that consumes me, but I am the fire.
    • Jorge Luis Borges, Otras inquisiciones (1952); first translated by Ruth L. C. Simms as Other Inquisitions, 1937–1952 (1964)
  • we get to think of life as an inexhaustible well. Yet everything happens only a certain number of times, and a very small number really. How many more times will you remember a certain afternoon of your childhood, some afternoon that is so deeply a part of your being that you can't even conceive of your life without it? Perhaps four or five times more, perhaps not even that. How many more times will you watch the full moon rise? Perhaps twenty. And yet it all seems limitless.
  • Someone once told me that time was a predator that stalked us all our lives. I rather believe that time is a companion who goes with us on the journey and reminds us to cherish every moment, because it will never come again. What we leave behind is not as important as how we've lived. After all Number One, we're only mortal.
  • Time is not bought ready-made at the watchmaker's.
  • You shouldn't chase after the past or place expectations on the future. What is past is left behind. The future is as yet unreached. Whatever quality is present you clearly see right there, right there.
    • Buddha, Bhaddekaratta Sutta: An Auspicious Day, MN 131, (1997) translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu
  • Yet Time, who changes all, had altered him
    In soul and aspect as in age; years steal
    Fire from the mind as vigour from the limb;
    And life's enchanted cup but sparkles near the brim.
  • O Time! the beautifier of the dead,
    Adorner of the ruin, comforter
    And only healer when the heart hath bled—
    Time! the corrector where our judgments err,
    The test of truth, love, sole philosopher,
    For all besides are sophists, from thy thrift
    Which never loses though it doth defer—
    Time, the avenger! unto thee I lift
    My hands, and eyes, and heart, and crave of thee a gift.

C[edit]

  • Time changes all things and cultivates even in herself an appreciation of irony, — and, therefore, why shouldn't I have changed a trifle?
  • The touch of time does more than the club of Hercules.
  • 'I could tell you my adventures — beginning from this morning,' said Alice a little timidly: 'but it's no use going back to yesterday, because I was a different person then.'
    'Explain all that,' said the Mock Turtle.
    'No, no! The adventures first,' said the Gryphon in an impatient tone: 'explanations take such a dreadful time.'
  • It's always tea time!
  • Eternity isn't some later time. Eternity isn't a long time. Eternity has nothing to do with time. Eternity is that dimension of here and now which thinking and time cuts out. This is it. And if you don't get it here, you won't get it anywhere. And the experience of eternity right here and now is the function of life. There's a wonderful formula that the Buddhists have for the Bodhisattva, the one whose being (sattva) is illumination (bodhi), who realizes his identity with eternity and at the same time his participation in time. And the attitude is not to withdraw from the world when you realize how horrible it is, but to realize that this horror is simply the foreground of a wonder and to come back and participate in it.
  • A butterfly
    Fluttering over the vendor's
    Dry flowers of spring
    Only two days it flies
    Caught by the lost boy
    Yet still.
    • Shane Castro, For Peng Fajardo, in The Now
  • With the magnificence of eternity before us, let time, with all its fluctuations, dwindle into its own littleness.
    • Thomas Chalmers, reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 584
  • Of this I am quite sure, that if we open a quarrel between the past and the present, we shall find that we have lost the future.
  • The more thorough the understanding needed, the further back in time one must go.
    • Gordon Clark, A Christian View of Men and Things (1951), p. 58.
  • In the spirit of faith let us begin each day, and we shall be sure to " redeem the time " which it brings to us, by changing it into something definite and eternal. There is a deep meaning in this phrase of the apostle, to redeem time. We redeem time, and do not merely use it. We transform it into eternity by living it aright.
    • James Freeman Clarke, reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 583
  • If you are living in the past or in the future, you will never find a meaning in the present.
    • Fausto Cercignani in: Brian Morris, Simply Transcribed. Quotations from Fausto Cercignani, 2013, p. 9
  • Time,— that black and narrow isthmus between two eternities.
    • Charles Caleb Colton, reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 582
  • "I am but as others: I am but what I was born to be."
    "Do you recognize what you were born to be? Not only a nobleman, but a gentleman; not only a gentleman, but a man — man, made in the image of God. How can you, how dare you, give the lie to your Creator?"
    "What has He given me? What have I to thank Him for?"
    "First, manhood; the manhood His Son disdained not to wear; worldly gifts, such as rank, riches, influence, things which others have to spend half an existence in earning; life in its best prime, with much of youth yet remaining — with grief endured, wisdom learnt, experience won. Would to Heaven, that by any poor word of mine I could make you feel all that you are — all that you might be!"
    A gleam, bright as a boy's hope, wild as a boy's daring, flashed from those listless eyes — then faded.
    "You mean, Mr. Halifax, what I might have been. Now it is too late."
    "There is no such word as 'too late,' in the wide world — nay, not in the universe. What! shall we, whose atom of time is but a fragment out of an ever-present eternity — shall we, so long as we live, or even at our life's ending, dare to cry out to the Eternal One, 'It is too late!'"
    • Dinah Craik, John Halifax, Gentleman (1857), Chapter 36
  • Time is what keeps everything from happening at once.

D[edit]

  • Truth was the only daughter of Time.
    • Leonardo da Vinci, The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci (1938), XIX Philosophical Maxims. Morals. Polemics and Speculations., as translated by Edward MacCurdy.
  • He is changing times and seasons, removing kings and setting up kings.
  • Rose: I can see everything. All that is, all that was, all that ever could be.
Doctor: That's what I see. All the time. And doesn't it drive you mad?
  • The whole time of my life may be divided into an infinity of parts, each of which is in no way dependent on any other; and, accordingly, because I was in existence a short time ago, it does not follow that I must now exist, unless in this moment some cause create me anew as it were,—that is, conserve me.
  • If we consider eternity, into that time never entered; eternity is not an everlasting flux of time, but time is as a short parenthesis in a long period; and eternity had been the same as it is, though time had never been.
    • John Donne, Book of Devotions, Meditation 14 (1624)
  • Time Prophet: Time begins and then time ends,
    and then time begins once again
    It is happening now, it has happened before,
    it will surely happen again.
Kai: Prophet, I have come to you,
here on this uncertain moon,
Do we Brunnen-G, have any hope,
or are my people doomed?
Time Prophet: I looked into the cycles of time,
not very clearly mind you
I gaze into, future past,
and I see the Brunnen-G doomed
For Kai you'll be the last to die,
and there is something else I see
the Shadows Order will be destroyed,
at the hands of the last Brunnen-G .
Kai: Are you certain Time Prophet?
Time Prophet: Time begins, and then time ends,
and then time begins once again
It is happening now, it has happened before,
it will surely happen again.
  • Lexx, Brigadoom (April 9, 1999), written by Paul Donovan & Lex Gigeroff.
  • The line it is drawn
    The curse it is cast
    The slow one now
    Will later be fast
    As the present now
    Will later be past

    The order is rapidly fadin’
    And the first one now will later be last
    For the times they are a-changin’.

E[edit]

  • Every reference-body (co-ordinate system) has its own particular time; unless we are told the reference-body to which the statement of time refers, there is no meaning in a statement of the time of an event.
  • If you don't take my words too seriously, I would say this: If we assume that all matter would disappear from the world, then, before relativity, one believed that space and time would continue existing in an empty world. But, according to the theory of relativity, if matter and its motion disappeared there would no longer be any space or time.
    • Albert Einstein (1921) as quoted by Philipp Frank, Einstein, His Life and Times (1947) 1st edition, Ch. VIII, Sect. 5, p. 178. In response to the question by an American journalist: How could one explain the content of the relativity theory in a few sentences?
  • Time present and time past
    Are both perhaps present in time future,
    And time future contained in time past.
    If all time is eternally present
    All time is unredeemable.
  • Time past and time future
    What might have been and what has been
    Point to one end, which is always present.
  • Time past and time future
    Allow but a little consciousness.
    To be conscious is not to be in time
    But only in time can the moment in the rose-garden,
    The moment in the arbour where the rain beat,
    The moment in the draughty church at smokefall
    Be remembered; involved with past and future.
    Only through time time is conquered.
    (II)
  • You cannot face it steadily, but this thing is sure,
    That time is no healer: the patient is no longer here. (III)
  • Fare forward, travellers! not escaping from the past
    Into different lives, or into any future;
    You are not the same people who left that station
    Or who will arrive at any terminus,
    While the narrowing rails slide together behind you.
  • Here between the hither and the farther shore
    While time is withdrawn, consider the future
    And the past with an equal mind.

A people without history
Is not redeemed from time, for history is a pattern
Of timeless moments.

  • Lots of things take time, and time was Momo's only form of wealth.
  • All dwelling in one house are strange brothers three,
    as unlike as any three brothers could be,
    yet try as you may to tell brother from brother,
    you'll find that the trio resemble each other.
    The first isn't there, though he'll come beyond doubt.
    The second's departed, so he's not about.
    The third and the smallest is right on the spot,
    And manage without him the others could not.
    Yet the third factor with which to be reckoned
    Because the first brother turns into the second.
    You cannot stand back and observe number three,
    For one of the others is all you will see.
    So tell me, my child, are the three of them one?
    Or are there but two? Or could there be none?
    Just name them, and you will at once realize
    That each rules a kingdom of infinite size.
    They rule it together and are it as well.
    In that, they're alike, so where do they dwell?

F[edit]

  • It's all now you see. Yesterday won't be over until tomorrow and tomorrow began ten thousand years ago. For every Southern boy fourteen years old, not once but whenever he wants it, there is the instant when it's still not yet two o'clock on that July afternoon in 1863, the brigades are in position behind the rail fence, the guns are laid and ready in the woods and the furled flags are already loosened to break out and Pickett himself with his long oiled ringlets and his hat in one hand probably and his sword in the other looking up the hill waiting for Longstreet to give the word and it's all in the balance, it hasn't happened yet, it hasn't even begun yet, it not only hasn't begun yet but there is still time for it not to begin against that position and those circumstances which made more men than Garnett and Kemper and Armistead and Wilcox look grave yet it's going to begin, we all know that, we have come too far with too much at stake and that moment doesn't need even a fourteen-year-old boy to think This time. Maybe this time with all this much to lose and all this much to gain: Pennsylvania, Maryland, the world, the golden dome of Washington itself to crown with desperate and unbelievable victory the desperate gamble, the cast made two years ago; or to anyone who ever sailed a skiff under a quilt sail, the moment in 1492 when somebody thought This is it: the absolute edge of no return, to turn back now and make home or sail irrevocably on and either find land or plunge over the world's roaring rim.
  • Time is a fluid condition which has no existence except in the momentary avatars of individual people. There is no such thing as was — only is. If was existed, there would be no grief or sorrow. I like to think of the world I created as being a kind of keystone in the universe; that, small as that keystone is, if it were ever taken away the universe itself would collapse.
  • The best general means to insure the profitable employment of our time, is to accustom ourselves to living in continual dependence upon the Spirit of God and His law, receiving, every instant, whatever He is pleased to bestow; consulting Him in every emergency requiring instant action, and having recourse to Him in our weaker moments when virtue seems to fail.
    • François Fénelon, reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 583
  • Dost thou love life? then do not squander time; for that is the stuff life is made of.
    • Benjamin Franklin, reported in Josiah Hotchkiss Gilbert, Dictionary of Burning Words of Brilliant Writers (1895), p. 582

G[edit]

  • Monday could not have arrived on a worse day. It could have been polite and waited until Tuesday or even Wednesday.
  • Of time you would make a stream upon whose bank you would sit and watch its flowing. Yet the timeless in you is aware of life's timelessness, And knows that 'yesterday is but today's memory and tomorrow is today's dream.
  • And is not time even as love is, undivided and paceless? But if in you thought you must measure time into seasons, let each season encircle all the other seasons, And let today embrace the past with remembrance and the future with longing.
  • Goliath: If I didn't fear the damage you would do to the time stream, I'd gladly leave you here.
David Xanatos: But you won't, because you didn't. Time travel's funny that way.
  • In October 1672 Jean Richer... had sailed to the South American island of Cayenne... While there, he noticed that the pendulum clock he had brought... ran ever so slightly slower than it did in Paris. ...When he shortened the three-foot pendulum by just one twelfth of an inch, it corrected the error. ... Isaac Newton, he immediately guessed the cause. The island of Cayenne, situated almost on the Equator, was farther from the center of the Earth's gravitational
How can I tell that the past isn't a fiction designed to account for the discrepancy between my immediate physical sensations and my state of mind? ~ Douglas Adams
Remember that time slurs over everything, let all deeds fade, blurs all writings and kills all memories. Except are only those which dig into the hearts of men by love. ~ Aristotle
O let not Time deceive you,
You cannot conquer Time. ~ W. H. Auden
We must not confuse the present with the past. With regard to the past, no further action is possible. ~ Simone de Beauvoir
Live in the present and shape the future, do not be casting lingering looks to the distant past for the past has passed away, never again to return. ~ Subramanya Bharathi
Time is the mercy of Eternity; without Time's swiftness Which is the swiftest of all things, all were eternal torment. ~ William Blake
Time is the most precious gift in our possession, for it is the most irrevocable. … Time lost is time when we have not lived a full human life, time unenriched by experience, creative endeavor, enjoyment, and suffering. ~ Dietrich Bonhoeffer
Don't waste your time, or time will waste you. ~ Muse (band)
Time can't be measured in days the way money is measured in pesos and centavos, because all pesos are equal, while every day, perhaps every hour, is different. ~ Jorge Luis Borges
Being with you and not being with you is the only way I have to measure time. ~ Jorge Luis Borges
This network of times which approached one another, forked, broke off, or were unaware of one another for centuries, embraces all possibilities of time. ~ Jorge Luis Borges
Time is the substance I am made of. Time is a river which sweeps me along, but I am the river; it is a tiger which destroys me, but I am the tiger; it is a fire which consumes me, but I am the fire. ~ Jorge Luis Borges
You shouldn't chase after the past or place expectations on the future. What is past is left behind. The future is as yet unreached. Whatever quality is present you clearly see right there, right there. ~ Buddha
Yet Time, who changes all, had altered him
In soul and aspect as in age; years steal
Fire from the mind as vigour from the limb;
And life's enchanted cup but sparkles near the brim. ~ Lord Byron
Shall we, whose atom of time is but a fragment out of an ever-present eternity — shall we, so long as we live, or even at our life's ending, dare to cry out to the Eternal One, "It is too late!" ~ Dinah Craik
There is a time for some things, and a time for all things; a time for great things, and a time for small things. ~ Miguel de Cervantes
With the magnificence of eternity before us, let time, with all its fluctuations, dwindle into its own littleness. ~ Thomas Chalmers
If we open a quarrel between the past and the present, we shall find that we have lost the future. ~ Winston Churchill
We redeem time, and do not merely use it. We transform it into eternity by living it aright. ~ James Freeman Clarke
If we consider eternity, into that time never entered; eternity is not an everlasting flux of time, but time is as a short parenthesis in a long period; and eternity had been the same as it is, though time had never been. ~ John Donne
Happy the man, and happy he alone,
He who can call today his own;
He who, secure within, can say,
Tomorrow, do thy worst, for I have lived today. ~ John Dryden
The slow one now
Will later be fast
As the present now
Will later be past...
For the times they are a-changin’. ~ Bob Dylan
To everything there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven. ~ Ecclesiastes
Time present and time past
Are both perhaps present in time future,
And time future contained in time past.
If all time is eternally present
All time is unredeemable. ~ T. S. Eliot
What might have been and what has been
Point to one end, which is always present. ~ T. S. Eliot
Fare forward, travellers! not escaping from the past
Into different lives, or into any future;
You are not the same people who left that station
Or who will arrive at any terminus,
While the narrowing rails slide together behind you. ~ T. S. Eliot
Clocks slay time. Time is dead as long as it is being clicked off by little wheels; only when the clock stops does time come to life. ~ William Faulkner
Time is a fluid condition which has no existence except in the momentary avatars of individual people. There is no such thing as was — only is. ~ William Faulkner
Dost thou love life? then do not squander time; for that is the stuff life is made of. ~ Benjamin Franklin
Yesterday is but today's memory and tomorrow is today's dream ~ Khalil Gibran
And is not time even as love is, undivided and paceless? ~ Khalil Gibran
Past and future must coexist with the present. Like a landscape extending as far as the eye can see, physical time exists in its entirety at once. The canvas of time stretches from the horizon of the past to the horizon of the future. All distinction between past, present and future is but an illusion. ~ Khalil Gibran
Embrace the past with remembrance and the future with longing. ~ Khalil Gibran
The timeless in you is aware of life's timelessness. ~ Khalil Gibran
The past is past, the future unformed. There is only the moment, and that is where he prefers to be. ~ William Gibson

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