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How To Address A Cover Letter To Multiple Recipients

Normally when you write a letter you address it to only one person at a time. Sometimes, however, you need to prepare a letter that addresses several different people at the same organization. For instance, if you are applying for a job that reports to several managers, you would want to address each hiring manager in your cover letter. Getting those multiple salutations right can be tricky, but there are some basic guidelines you can use.

1. Find the name and proper spelling of each individual to whom you need to address the letter.

2. Address men as Mr. and women as Ms. unless you know for sure that the recipient prefers a different title. Use Dr. if the individual is a medical doctor or holds a Ph.D.

3. Include all the names on the salutation line if you must send a single letter to several recipients. For instance, a letter to Bob Jones and Sally Smith would be addressed "Dear Mr. Jones and Ms. Smith." Use a colon at the end of the salutation line.

4. Make copies of the letter and send a separate letter addressed to each person. Even if you use a single salutation line for all recipients, you should still send the letters separately.

Tip

  • Send a separate letter to each person if you can. When sending a post-interview thank you letter, for instance, it is best to address each individual with a separate and individualized letter.

About the Author

Based in Pennsylvania, Bonnie Conrad has been working as a professional freelance writer since 2003. Her work can be seen on Credit Factor, Constant Content and a number of other websites. Conrad also works full-time as a computer technician and loves to write about a number of technician topics. She studied computer technology and business administration at Harrisburg Area Community College.

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Dear Reader,

We know it's frustrating when a job posting doesn't include the name of the person in charge of the hiring process.

We also know that's not an excuse to slap any salutation on your cover letter and send your application off.

According to Amanda Augustine, career advice expert for TopResume, you should always do some research to figure out who exactly the person reading your letter will be.

You can even play it safe by writing at the beginning of your cover letter: "I noticed you're working in [whatever department] at [whatever company]," so you show that based on your research, it looks like they're involved in the hiring process.

In the case that you absolutely, positively can't find a person's name, Augustine said certain ways of addressing your cover letter are more off-putting than others. For example, "Dear Hiring Manager" and "Dear Recruiter" aren't great openings, but they're the best of many bad options.

Here's the full list of cover-letter openings, ranked in reverse order of egregiousness.

Sincerely,
Business Insider staff

P.S. This advice doesn't apply in the case of an anonymous job posting, when a company is deliberately keeping their name and the names of their employees confidential.

5. "Dear Hiring Manager" or "Dear Recruiter"

The language in your cover letter should be at once professional and conversational, Augustine said. And these openings aren't overly formal or casual, which is a plus.

But the lack of customization — you could submit this letter to any company you're applying to — will still stand out.

"You're not earning brownie points" with this salutation, Augustine said. "But you're not putting people off" either.

4. "Dear HR Professional"

Augustine said this opening isn't necessarily accurate.

The person reading your application might not work in the company's human resources department, or they might call themselves a recruiter instead of a human resources professional.

3. "Hello" or "Hi"

With "Hello" and no name after it, you've gotten the conversational part down, but you've still failed to customize your letter.

"Hi" is a double whammy, since not only is it not customized, but it can also be considered slang, Augustine said.

2. "Dear Sir or Madam"

You might think you're being clever by covering your bases in terms of gender, Augustine said. But you're actually making a big mistake by being so formal.

If you're applying to a startup, for example, Augustine said this kind of language probably wouldn't fit the company culture.

Even if you're applying to a more traditional company, the fact that your opening isn't customized at all is a big turn-off.

1. "To Whom It May Concern"

"It's so incredibly formal in its language," Augustine said of this opening. "I read that and I think, 'This person doesn't care at all.'"

If they did care, they would have tried to figure out who exactly the recruiter or the hiring manager is.

Moreover, "To Whom It May Concern" conveys exactly the opposite impression of professional and conversational that you're trying to project.

Augustine's rule of thumb when writing cover letters is to ask yourself: If this letter was coming to me, would I want to read it? Chances are good that, if someone addressed you this way, you wouldn't be so intrigued.

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